New measures for residential wood smoke emissionsNew measures for residential wood smoke emissions<div class="ExternalClass301F4BE6DB8B44BD9D3350B6C7757E89"><p>​Metro Vancouver is taking measures to address residential wood smoke, which is responsible for more than a quarter of fine particulate matter emissions in the region and can cause respiratory and cardiac health effects, particularly for infants, the elderly and people with existing heart and lung conditions.</p><p>A new bylaw is being drafted to regulate these emissions, which may increase this year as a result of the seasonal drop in temperatures and limited supply of natural gas across B.C. Localized spikes in concentrations of fine particulate matter often occur in the fall and winter evenings when residential wood burning is more popular and colder, stagnant air at ground level prevents air pollutants from dispersing.</p><p>The move follows extensive consultation with residents, businesses, and health agencies and will complement a variety of educational and incentive programs that Metro Vancouver has in place to reduce wood smoke from indoor wood-burning stoves and fireplaces across the region.</p><p>Air quality staff members are also looking at more ways to help residents burn more cleanly, lower emissions from wood-burning appliances, enhance the energy efficiency of homes, and improve indoor air quality through the use of cleaner burning practices.</p><p>Residents wishing to use their fireplace or stove can use Metro Vancouver’s online air quality and weather tool, <a href="http://www.airmap.ca/" target="_blank">AirMap</a>, to check the ‘Residential Wood Burning Status’ for their municipality, and find out whether burning is advisable. </p><p>Metro Vancouver also operates a <a href="/services/air-quality/projects-initiatives/Pages/wood-stove-exchange.aspx" target="_blank">Wood Stove Exchange Program</a>, which provides eligible residents with incentives of up to $400 to replace old wood-burning appliances with cleaner burning wood or natural gas models, and offers workshops with tips and techniques to improve the efficiency of wood-heating systems and reduce wood smoke. </p><p>The new bylaw is expected to include a phased approach to regulate the emissions, with seasonal restrictions, registration requirements, and limits on the operation of older, more polluting wood-burning devices starting in 2020, 2022 and 2025, respectively.</p></div>http://www.metrovancouver.org/metroupdate/PublishingImages/Issue48-woodsmoke.jpg2018-12-19T08:00:00ZGP0|#3063252b-10c7-407c-bea0-257765670655;L0|#03063252b-10c7-407c-bea0-257765670655|Issue 48;GTSet|#d14ffe11-45dc-48fb-8684-ff109cf15a74<div class="ExternalClass21480B8EE47B4CD18A1FBDC051A6AE40"><p>​Metro Vancouver is taking measures to address residential wood smoke, which is responsible for more than a quarter of fine particulate matter emissions in the region and can cause respiratory and cardiac health effects, particularly for infants, the elderly and people with existing heart and lung conditions. </p></div>0