Plans underway to upgrade Iona Wastewater Treatment PlantPlans underway to upgrade Iona Wastewater Treatment Plant<div class="ExternalClassE7614DBC574141EBAE395FD4170B7523"><p>Metro Vancouver continues to improve its 50-year-old Iona Island Wastewater Treatment Plant, which provides <a href="/media-room/video-gallery/issues/218315462?utm_source=newsletter58&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=chair_update" target="_blank">primary treatment</a> to about 750,000 residents and businesses in Vancouver, UBC, the University Endowment Lands, and small areas of Burnaby and Richmond.</p><p>The plant is scheduled to undergo a major upgrade to meet regulatory requirements by 2030 and, as a result, has projects underway that focus on the treatment and storage of biosolids -- organic matter recycled from wastewater during treatment. </p><p>When wastewater comes into the plant, it is treated to reduce solids and organic matter content. During the treatment, solids are heated and broken down by naturally occurring microorganisms, which reduce harmful bacteria and odours. The final product is an earth-like material that can be applied to land as fertilizer that Metro Vancouver calls Nutrifor. </p><p>However, with a growing population, in 2015, Metro Vancouver embarked on three projects to improve wastewater treatment and storage of solids:</p><ul><li>Upgrades to a primary sludge thickener, which is now complete and is back in full service;</li><li>Construction of a new solids handling building equipped with grit and screenings removal facilities and a new sludge thickener, which is nearing completion. The equipment has been installed and tested, and plant staff are getting ready to start using this new process in late July;</li><li>Upgrades to all four anaerobic sludge digesters with improved mixing are underway and scheduled for completion in 2020.</li></ul><p><em><u>BioSolids Dewatering Facility:</u></em></p><p>The digested sludge is thickened in four large sludge lagoons and then transferred to a land-drying area at the plant, before it is trucked off site for beneficial use or disposal. In preparation for the plant’s upgrade, the lagoons and the biosolids stockpile in the land drying area need to be removed. Without the lagoons available to store and thicken sludge, a new biosolids dewatering facility is needed by the end of 2020.</p><p><em><u>The new Iona Island Secondary WWTP:</u></em></p><p>Local communities will be engaged throughout the design process. The project definition phase for the new plant, which has just begun, will be completed by 2019 and will produce a design, life-cycle cost estimates, a design and construction schedule and a recommended procurement delivery model.</p></div>http://www.metrovancouver.org/metroupdate/PublishingImages/issue34-iona.jpg2017-07-31T07:00:00ZGP0|#2c0fce0a-9b46-4bae-b276-c523188c6aa3;L0|#02c0fce0a-9b46-4bae-b276-c523188c6aa3|Issue 34;GTSet|#d14ffe11-45dc-48fb-8684-ff109cf15a74<div class="ExternalClass0F2F8D94C1DE4418A3CD3DBCD37A6568"><p>Metro Vancouver continues to improve its 50-year-old Iona Island Wastewater Treatment Plant, which provides <a href="/media-room/video-gallery/issues/218315462" target="_blank">primary liquid waste treatment</a> to about 750,000 residents and businesses in Vancouver, UBC, the University Endowment Lands, and small areas of Burnaby and Richmond. The plant is scheduled to undergo a major upgrade to secondary treatment by 2030 and, as a result, has two projects underway that focus on the treatment and storage of biosolids -- organic matter recycled from sewage. </p></div>0