Air quality expected to improve by 2035 despite more vehicles on the roadAir quality expected to improve by 2035 despite more vehicles on the road<div class="ExternalClass078E678ABB51481B84385FBC2C338E57"><p>Although unprecedented levels of wildfire smoke have affected Metro Vancouver’s air quality in recent years, smog-forming pollutants are expected to continue to decline in Metro Vancouver over the next 20 years, according to the latest Caring for the Air report for 2019.</p><p>The eighth annual report suggests that from 2015 to 2035, regional smog-forming emissions from vehicles could decrease by 10 per cent and regional GHG emissions are expected to decrease by one percent. Initiatives for non-road diesel engines and residential wood heating are contributing to the improvements in smog-forming emissions. Despite more vehicles on the road, key measures such as enhanced emissions standards for vehicles and lower-carbon fuels are producing emissions reductions. Programs to increase awareness and uptake of electric vehicles can drive these reductions even further, moving Metro Vancouver towards its targets in the Climate 2050 Strategy.</p><p>In recent years, wildfire smoke has triggered lengthy air quality advisories, with an unprecedented 22 days under air quality advisories in the summer of 2018. The increased number of advisories underscores the importance of Metro Vancouver’s extensive Air Quality Monitoring Network, which includes 31 monitoring stations from Horseshoe Bay to Hope, and collects data every hour, seven days a week. This data available to the public in real-time data at <a href="http://www.airmap.ca/" target="_blank">www.airmap.ca</a>.</p><p>A discussion paper on a new Clean Air Plan is expected to go to the public and interested parties for feedback and comments in 2019, with adoption of a new Clean Air Plan (Metro Vancouver’s fourth) to be considered by the Board in 2020. Metro Vancouver is also implementing its Climate 2050 Strategy, which will guide policy and actions across the region to reduce carbon emissions and prepare for the effects of a changing climate.</p></div>http://www.metrovancouver.org/metroupdate/PublishingImages/issue54-aq.jpg2019-06-27T07:00:00ZGP0|#571b1e35-a760-4f0f-968e-cf31102ad527;L0|#0571b1e35-a760-4f0f-968e-cf31102ad527|Issue 54;GTSet|#d14ffe11-45dc-48fb-8684-ff109cf15a74<div class="ExternalClass31A2EEFBE75B4145AD9C67F3F58245AE"><p>​Although unprecedented levels of wildfire smoke have affected Metro Vancouver’s air quality in recent years, smog-forming pollutants are expected to continue to decline in Metro Vancouver over the next 20 years, according to the latest Caring for the Air report for 2019.</p></div>0