eDNA tracks rare specieseDNA tracks rare species<div class="ExternalClassD3BAA9ED6C57469CB84F6566AC6C73B8"><p>Metro Vancouver Regional Parks is using environmental DNA (eDNA) to find out more about rare and sensitive species living in regional parks.</p><p>The technique collects DNA from environmental samples such as water or soil rather than directly from the animal. When an animal such as a frog or fish interacts with its natural habitat, it sheds DNA in the form of skin cells, feces, saliva, plasma and more. Developed over the last 10 years, this technology is a useful and reliable tool. eDNA is a low impact way to inventory sensitive species because it does not require capturing or handling animals. </p><p>This spring, Regional Parks staff will test water from several small streams in Lynn Headwaters Regional Park and Grouse Mountain Regional Park to learn more about the fish and amphibians living there. Some of the species that might be identified through eDNA sampling include: coastal cutthroat trout, northern red-legged frog, coastal tailed frog and the Pacific water shrew. These are also important species to consider in terms of park management. </p><p>The eDNA samples will be sent to a University of Victoria lab that will conduct the genetic analysis. Regional Parks will then be able to use the reported information to protect important species and their habitat in regional parks.</p></div>http://www.metrovancouver.org/metroupdate/PublishingImages/issue51-edna.jpg2019-03-28T07:00:00ZGP0|#fa10f1b3-b2b5-4771-aabf-d0c9cee82ee2;L0|#0fa10f1b3-b2b5-4771-aabf-d0c9cee82ee2|Issue 51;GTSet|#d14ffe11-45dc-48fb-8684-ff109cf15a74<div class="ExternalClassEB02A05E50CD42619CAE8D53FDE7706A"><p>​Metro Vancouver Regional Parks is using environmental DNA (eDNA) to find out more about rare and sensitive species living in regional parks.</p></div>0The northern red-legged frog, pictured above, is a species at risk in BC and can be inventoried using eDNA.