Learning About Reconciliation and Orange Shirt DayLearning About Reconciliation and Orange Shirt Day<div class="ExternalClass21C7D43EBA304E288DB41E7595797F92"><p>Phyllis Webstad still remembers how her new orange shirt was stripped off her on her first day at a residential school in Williams Lake in 1973. </p><p>Her powerful story, which she shared with Metro Vancouver staff recently during a Lunch and Learn session at head office, led to what is now known as an annual Orange Shirt Day, which raises awareness about the history of residential schools and the effects of residential schools on aboriginal peoples. The date of the event is September 30, which the federal government is considering establishing as a statutory holiday. On that day, everyone is encouraged to wear either an “Every Child Matters” orange T-shirt or lapel buttons as a gesture of reconciliation and support for the survivors and families of victims of Indian Residential Schools. Board members will receive their buttons at the September 28 meeting. </p><p>Webstad’s presentation offered insights into the tragic, long-term effects of residential schools, the move toward reconciliation with the Indigenous Peoples in Canada and the origins of Orange Shirt Day. Raising staff awareness forms part of the Metro Vancouver Board’s response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s 94 Calls to Action. </p><p>Other Board priorities include building better relations with First Nation communities and providing cultural competency training to staff. A quarterly update report, covering past reconciliation activities and future opportunities, is included in Board agendas.</p></div>http://www.metrovancouver.org/metroupdate/PublishingImages/issue46-orangeshirtday.jpg2018-09-28T07:00:00ZGP0|#1d957925-3125-4fc8-b07f-ef2367c1a312;L0|#01d957925-3125-4fc8-b07f-ef2367c1a312|Issue 46;GTSet|#d14ffe11-45dc-48fb-8684-ff109cf15a74<div class="ExternalClass3EC6E83EDE2D47E2BFAFDF488A7DBA3C"><p>​<span lang="EN-US">Phyllis Webstad still remembers how her new orange shirt was stripped off her on her first day at a residential school in Williams Lake in 1973. She shared her story at a recent Lunch and Learn, ahead of Orange Shirt Day on Sept. 30.</span></p></div>0Phyllis Webstad shared her story about residential schools at a recent Lunch and Learn