Caring for the Air report shows improvementCaring for the Air report shows improvement<div class="ExternalClass760193DE71854ECA8428C45615217D99"><p>​Heavy smoke from B.C.’s wildfires took a toll on Metro Vancouver’s air quality last year, but average trends show improvements continue to be made for most smog-forming pollutants across the region, according to the latest <a href="/services/air-quality/AirQualityPublications/CaringfortheAir2018.pdf" target="_blank">Caring for the Air report for 2018</a>.</p><p>The release of the seventh annual report, which coincided with national Clean Air Day, describes the progress made on air quality and climate change projects undertaken by Metro Vancouver, the Fraser Valley and other partners in 2017 and early 2018. For instance, while the unprecedented levels of wildfire smoke significantly affected air quality last year, several emission-reduction actions, such as more stringent objectives for sulphur dioxide (SO<sub>2</sub>), helped to improve it.</p><p>In advance of this summer, Metro Vancouver led an initiative to develop more effective communication about wildfire smoke for residents in the Lower Fraser Valley. A working group reviewed the information provided to the public from agencies in the summer of 2017, assessed gaps that may have exacerbated public concerns during wildfire events and is working on ways to ensure the public receives information from credible sources if wildfire smoke causes air quality degradation in the air shed. </p><p>The working group is a collaboration of staff from Metro Vancouver, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Health Canada, BC Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy, Fraser Valley Regional District, Northwest Clean Air Agency, Vancouver Coastal Health, Fraser Health, BC Lung Association and the BC Centre for Disease Control. </p></div>http://www.metrovancouver.org/metroupdate/PublishingImages/issue44-cfta.jpg2018-06-29T07:00:00ZGP0|#608033f6-67b5-46c2-9f78-c51d935d0a07;L0|#0608033f6-67b5-46c2-9f78-c51d935d0a07|Issue 44;GTSet|#d14ffe11-45dc-48fb-8684-ff109cf15a74<div class="ExternalClass4D033A16283240A08136A66D2FC48626"><p>​Heavy smoke from B.C.’s wildfires took a toll on Metro Vancouver’s air quality last year, but average trends show improvements continue to be made for most smog-forming pollutants across the region, according to the latest <a href="http://subscription.metrovancouver.org/sites/chairupdate/SitePages/Home.aspx?jg=e489a863-fc71-4d77-9b2d-1142e35d9518&eg=9df85a24-cf57-4247-ab7c-c0fe77fd782b&lg=1f0c9be7-3f6a-40c0-aa94-a4a57250e439&ltp=c" target="_blank">Caring for the Air report for 2018</a>.</p></div>0