Media Releases

 

 

​A former B.C. Rail train station in North Vancouver is being deconstructed to make way for a new wastewater treatment plant that Metro Vancouver proposes to build to replace the old Lions Gate primary treatment plant. In a deconstruction, structures are meticulously dismantled so their components are separated to maximize reuse and recycling of building materials. “We are aiming to reuse or recycle 90 per cent of all material from the site,” said Zero Waste Committee Chair Malcolm Brodie. “More and more contractors in the region are embracing deconstruction because it saves money and reduces environmental impact. The deconstruction project illustrates the regional district’s commitment to reduce waste and recover resources by re-using and recycling.” Deconstruction projects offset disposal costs while generating revenue from material sales. In this project, large wood pieces recovered from the site will be remanufactured into flooring; metal and drywall will be recycled; bricks and concrete will be crushed for road material and the old freight shed will find new life as a storage shed on a farm in Langley. The site is being cleared so that construction may begin on the new Lions Gate Secondary Wastewater Treatment Plant, which will replace the existing facility that has served the North Shore municipalities of West Vancouver, the City of North Vancouver and the District of North Vancouver for over 50 years. “This is one of the first steps on the path to a state of the art, environmentally-friendly wastewater treatment plant for the North Shore,” said Utilities Committee Chair Darrell Mussatto. The new facility will reflect community values and interests while helping ensure liquid waste continues to be managed safely, affordably and effectively. Commissioning of the new plant is expected in 2020. For more information about the Lions Gate project, please check out: http://www.metrovancouver.org/LionsGate/ A video story about the deconstruction project is posted here: http://bcove.me/w39rz48o  A high-resolution, television broadcast-quality version of that video story is available upon request.